Yves Delorme’s designs for your home

Let these dreamy and ethereal designs and hues from Yves Delorme lend charm and sophistication to your home.

Ailleurs Multi by Yves Delorme

Ailleurs Multi from Where the Wind Blows

The Yves Delorme brand belongs to the French family-owned company Fremaux-Delorme. Founded by Ernestine Fremaux, the company has been producing fine linens since 1845, which gives it the distinction of being one of the longest continually operating textile manufacturers in France. Their collections follow various innovative themes and this year too four prime themes run across their bed linens, cushions, towels, bathrobes, scarves, bath mat and many more products. Here’s a quick look at the four concepts for 2015:

Head in the Clouds

“The ephemeral and mobile nature of clouds is akin to that of dreams. We see clouds suspended in the real atmosphere. Their haphazard shapes fuel our imagination, our ability to form and deform images according to our perception and subjectivity. ‘Voguer’ sketches out the trajectory of an item flying through space, adopting the regular graphic rhythm of ‘Zig Zag.’ The curves of embroidered motifs in “Douce” complement the precision of the angular geometry used for ‘Voguer’ and ‘Zig Zag’.”

Where the Wind Blows

“The “Courant d’Air” collection is an invitation to travel. Embarking on an imaginary journey we discover the foreignness of what we see all around us every day. It is a new way of seeing, reality brimming with light. Movements caused by energies affect the mobility of terrestrial and celestial elements. A breath of wind crumples the surface of the water, conjuring up sinusoidal waves. Water becomes an optical instrument that refracts, reflects and disperses light. Short, coloured threads echo this phenomenon in the undulating effect of ‘Eau Douce Glace’ Jacquard. Softly swaying trees in a tropical forest become the foam on a sea of plants. Every fragile leaf and flower tissue captures humidity from the air and light from the sun. In the ‘Ailleurs’ print, air waves captured in picture form are in perfect harmony with movement in the plant world.”

Beyond the Looking Glass

“The design is intended to suggest something akin to the image we have of clouds. Clouds sit at different altitudes in the sky. Although they may look like cotton wool or wadding, or appear to be immaterial, they are made up of a multitude of ice crystals, prisms, facets of a mirror, reflecting the light beaming out from the sun and the earth. There is a fine line between what we see and what we imagine. The multiplication of a faceted geometric shape is captured in graphic form in “Prisme”. Captured in a play of weaves, with a satin warp and a satin weft. A delicate pink hue, Nude, adds warmth to its luminous whiteness. ‘Miroir’ propels the graphic shape on a horizontal trajectory. The parallel lines of each side of the prism are sketched out in bourdon stitch, in the colour Nude, on dazzling white cotton satin. Using a play of watermark-effect weaves, ‘Visible’ renders some areas of the shape visible and others invisible. The plant shape is merely suggested by the two tones of yarn, natural and white. Looking into a mirror can make certain items appear more clearly or multiply their number, erasing those that seem less important with the intention of making things look different. A Cloud, a dreamlike element, evokes reverie, the time and space of sleep.”

Cultivating our Garden

“The verb ‘To Be’ is synonymous with existing. Existing in tea green for the Guelder Rose on a snowball tree. Existing in powder pink for the Ranunculus bloom. Existing in bluish white for the Lilac flower. Being is the fact of really existing in substance, in essence. Being a Guelder Rose, a snowball of small corollas. Being a Cumulus, a cotton-wool cloud made up of tiny droplets of water. Being a Ranunculus flower, a compact ball of dozens of serried petals. Being an Opacus, the type of cloud that blocks out the light. Being a Lilac flower, corollas of 4 single petals in superposed layers of white and lilac ripples. Being a Stratocumulus, a low-altitude cloud that develops vertically and becomes fog when it encounters the earth. Using comparisons to better define the nature of things. Creating a dialogue between images to foster poetry. Cultivating our garden.

You can view some of their products in the slideshow below. If you would like to purchase any of their items, please visit their website. You can also opt for their bespoke monogram service and get your initials hand-stitched on to the products. This service is offered at Yves Delorme, Harrods 2nd floor, Tel: 0207-893-8824.

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